Industries Served Selection
KOBOLD Timepiece

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The Kobold ad is an example of a great story which may grab the reader - even to the end - but is so short on product attributes and benefits, that the story doesn't have a happy ending.

Category

Score
% of Category Achieved
Headline
20.80
83.20%
Visual Impact
18.12
65.90
Copy
18.81
75.25
Consumer Appeal
15.35
68.20
Total
73.08
73.08

Headline – This category has seven (7) points of analysis with emphasis on stopping power and selection of the target market. The headline reaches out to those who seek or fantasize about a life of adventure. (Note: Most chronograph watches are positioned with an adventure aura.) Beyond the sheer persuasion of a true "authentic," this headline also taps into the "good enough" theory, which may in fact, be the root of all "celebrity" endorsements. This is the theory that allows the consumer to conclude that - "if it's good enough [works} for him/her or high-need people (i.e., Head and Shoulders Dandruff Shampoo), it will be great for me." The headline stopping and interest power turned out to be the strongest section of the ad, even though it doesn't relate directly to the product.

Visual Impact – With eight (8) points of analysis, this category is critical to an ad's stopping power, product name registration, and emotionality, among others. Stopping power was the best part of this section which otherwise was just a little better than average. In the watch world, especially the chronograph - product is king. Potential users want to be captivated by the technology - the more dials, the better - after all [the consumer perceives] "when it's on my wrist, it shows the world that I am the type of person to own such a watch." As portrayed, the watch is secondary to the persona and his story. So while the photograph of the explorer, and the adventure he personifies is very strong, the simple product characteristics - and thereby implied user benefit come off poorly. (A better product shot would have made a significant difference.)

Copy – Story-telling copy is usually engrossing, but generally is lacking in news and positioning strategy. This was the case here. The potential buyer is absorbed by the adventures of Sir Ranulph Fiennes. Here the sheer authority of the referent is a powerful psychological link to the performance of the watch. But here's the payoff. There is virtually none. In a half-page of solid copy, these were the only words about the product - "His professional-grade expedition timepiece from Kobold may just be the tool he needs to help pass the time." Not enough.

Consumer Appeal – This summary category of six (6) points of analysis deals with how it all hangs together - how well it shows an understanding of the consumer's need, and how/if it sets up the dissonance factor with his/her existing product. The points in this section were average in all respects, showing no real connection with the consumer. In all, a most disappointing ad, which could/should have engaged the consumer with at least some product connection - enough to make him say, "I want it."


Grayson Associates’ proprietary system to analyze the effectiveness
of print advertising.

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